Seconds

One of my biggest fears about having a daughter has been passing along my food issues to her. Though I’m long past my dark days of disordered eating, I still think a lot about food and fitness quite a bit (and still journal) and though they don’t plague me, I still emotionally eat from time to time and still have “fat” days. Even though I know I’m not actually “fat,” I certainly have some weight to lose to get to my feel-best weight/size and I will eventually …

[Sadly, even an upcoming Caribbean trip this spring isn’t enough to get me to the gym regularly again and off the sweets. <<Sigh>> One of these days I’ll get it together…]

Anyway, yesterday I had to catch myself when I saw Maya’s daily log at school. Continue reading “Seconds”

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Tune in to yourself … like a baby

We can learn a lot from watching babies.

Babies, who can’t express themselves in any ways except crying and smiling (at least in the beginning, before they can communicate via expressions and words) are incredibly attuned to their needs … and once those needs are met, they move on. They eat til they’re full, sleep til they’re not tired, stop playing when they’re bored … They don’t dwell, there’s no guilt, there’s no nothing except the here and now.

[Until three hours later when another need arises, that is!]

They are so absolutely in tune with their own bodies that it’s almost mind-blowing that we adults (who live in a world of excess food and minimal sleep, who play Words with Friends instead of hitting the hay even though we are bone-tired … ) need to retrain ourselves to get back to that place of primitiveness and simplicity. Continue reading “Tune in to yourself … like a baby”

On Satiety

It’s truly fascinating watching an infant eat. Babies know when they’re hungry … but more importantly, they know when they’re full. This makes me even more convinced that satiety is, indeed, an innate concept … yet something many of us lose over time.

If Maya is hungry, she’ll cry, start noshing on her hands, squirm …  and if she has had enough, she’ll purse her lips or put her hands in front of her face or, if she’s nursing, fall asleep at the breast or pull away from me for a break.

Some days she’s hungrier than others … and while she always eats, some days I worry she isn’t getting enough … and then other days she eats more and/or has more than her usual eight feedings. Continue reading “On Satiety”