Katie Couric Admits She Was Bulimic

Katie Couric — mom to two girls — recently confessed she had been bulimic during and after college.

While it certainly isn’t ground-breaking news that a strong, smart, beautiful and powerful woman could have battled an eating disorder in her past life, upon reading this, I couldn’t help but wonder: did she ever talk to her daughters about her past issues, or did she keep it a secret from them, too? And either way, how did she encourage them to have a healthy relationship with food? Was it hard to lead by example given her history?

Granted, I’m not BFF with Katie Couric and I’ll never have the opportunity to ask her such questions, but it does bring up a question I’ve been asked quite a bit, especially in light of some of the press I’ve done in my role as an advocate: do I plan tell Maya about my disordered eating history? Continue reading “Katie Couric Admits She Was Bulimic”

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New Memoir: Not All Black Girls Know How to Eat

Note: this is a cross-post I wrote over at WeAretheRealDeal.com today.

notallblackgirls_finalStephanie Covington Armstrong, a recovered bulimic and an African-American woman, is the author of the new memoir, Not All Black Girls Know How to Eat.

A friend of mine heard her interview on NPR recently and passed it on to me, thinking it would be a great topic for this blog. I couldn’t agree more.

I haven’t gotten my hands on a copy of Stephanie’s memoir, but I certainly intend to.

You know how they say never to judge a book by its cover? Well, in this case, the cover is compelling in and of itself.

While I’ve never experienced bulimia and don’t know a ton about the mechanics of the disease, apparently (according to this review I read) the image on the front cover of her memoir is of the index and middle fingers — the two fingers used to induce vomiting.

Continue reading “New Memoir: Not All Black Girls Know How to Eat

A Dollar A Day

Piggy bankI’ve confessed I have a wee bit of a shopping problem, and that one of the biggest problems with my history of chewing and spitting was that I was wasting food (i.e., money) left and rightliterally.

Fortunately, I haven’t chewed/spit in well over three monthshurrah, me!

But I’ve still had trouble buying stuff and just taking a bite before chucking it, when I know deep down I just don’t need it, yet I emotionally want it for whatever the reason du jour.

And, more importantly, if I’m not going to be eating the whole thing anyway (in a day, or a week), why bother buying it in the first place?

My best friend and I were dorm mates all through college, and it always amazed me how she could have a pack of M&Ms on her desk that could last for a week.

She has a serious sweet tooth like me (hello, it’s naturally part of why we’re BFF!). And if she wanted to eat the whole pack in a day, she would eat it, no prob.

But if it was in front of me or on my desk for a minute, chances were, it’d be gone, whether I wanted it or not — for me, it’s often emotional; she doesn’t struggle with that attachment to food like I always have.

So about three weeks ago, after a talk with my husband (where I shared how I really want to grasp the concept of saving better) he suggested a good, easy idea I could start immediately: putting just a dollar a day in a little jar at home (vs. sliding money into my savings account, which just feels automatic and cold).

Just a buck. No big commitment, right? Continue reading “A Dollar A Day”

Is Anyone Else Annoyed by Stephanie Pratt’s Bulimia Disclosure?

IMG00007As you might recall, I am reading Dara Chadwick’s awesome guide for moms and their daughters as they navigate the roller coaster of adolescence, You’d Be So Pretty If …

(Review to come soon!)

One of the things she talks about is how media consumption can play a role in how we (and our daughters) feel about ourselves/themselves … but that ignoring media or banning it isn’t the solution. Rather, keeping an open dialogue is — and I agree with her 100 percent.

Like Dara, I can’t imagine giving up my magazine addiction — though lately I’ve been annoyed by the same stories circulating in publications..

But I hope to be able to do what Dara has done with her daughter: sit down with her and talk honestly and openly about air-brushing, how models/actresses/celebrities are paid to look a certain way and that it’s unrealistic of us to feel inadequate next to them, etc.

However, I literally cringed this morning when I saw this headline: ‘Hills’ Star Says Thin Co-Stars Brought Her to Bulimia Continue reading “Is Anyone Else Annoyed by Stephanie Pratt’s Bulimia Disclosure?”

Beating Ana: The Long-Awaited Review

mailA while ago, I was asked to review the new book, Beating Ana, by Shannon Cutts. This weekend, I finally had a chance to read her work.

Though I personally have never experienced anorexia or bulimia — both of which she successfully recovered from — I really liked the easy flow of her writing, and the positive tone she carries throughout the book.

(Disclaimer: I’ve never read a recovery book, so I honestly didn’t know what to expect).

But even as someone who never dealt with the severe mental illnesses she did, I can still relate on my own level. I’d recommend this book to anyone ready to take that step.

I liked how she makes the connection that, in recovery, relationships replace eating disorders. Continue reading “Beating Ana: The Long-Awaited Review”

THIN: The HBO Documentary

thin-posterA part of me fears the following post might be too sensitive or hit too close to home for some readers. I say this because I know my audience ranges from people without any eating disorders and weight issues; people with eating disorders and weight issues; people trying to lose weight; people who have lost weight and kept it off; disordered eaters … friends, family … my readership is all over the place and I love the variety.

I deeply respect and admire the women in this film who sought help, whether it was for the first time or the fifteenth time … and I wish everyone with an ED could do the same: get help. It takes a ton of courage to make that call or visit, and so I have utmost respect for these ladies. And so the readers I’m mostly concerned about in this post are those currently in the throes of their eating disorders; I don’t want to upset anyone — hence today’s pre-post note.

Personally, I don’t know what it’s like to starve myself, and I don’t know what it’s like to binge or purge … I don’t pretend to know what it’s like; for all my disordered eating behaviors, I’ve never dealt with anorexia or bulimia. Though I am coming at this film more as someone perpetually struggling with her weight/body acceptance more than as someone with a clinical eating disorder, I do realize just how serious these diseases are.

Please know I’m not judging anyone; I simply care. My blog is about transparency and being honest, and I can’t sugarcoat how I felt after seeing something so moving.

That said, here is my review of the HBO documentary THIN (2006) which I finally saw for the first time Wednesday night. Continue reading “THIN: The HBO Documentary”

Blurring the Lines: Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating

photoshop-windy-colored-wavy-shear-windWhen I began blogging, I always considered being a disordered eater a separate entity from having an eating disorder.

After all, every woman seems to be a “disordered eater” in one way or another.

And since I never truly binged; never binged and purged (I cry when I throw up; last time was alcohol-induced, at a Dave Matthews Band concert back in 1999); and never starved myself, I was “in the clear,” so to speak … at least in my own little head.

I didn’t classify myself with the girls who threw up their lunches or worked out for four hours a day and lived on lettuce leaves.

I had a complex, thinking, “Well, I’d do anything but that …” as though that made me less culpable or something.

In my head, I wasn’t one of “them”. I just exercised a lot and watched every morsel that went into my mouth.

But I mean, really, who was I kidding? I still had a big, undeniable problem. What might sound admirable (being a militant exerciser and keeping a meticulous food journal) was hurting me –and those I love and who love me — in more ways than one. Continue reading “Blurring the Lines: Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating”